Daniel Cassidy Celebrates Fifty Years of Practicing Law

Daniel Cassidy Celebrates Fifty Years of Practicing Law

Liebert Cassidy Whitmore would like to congratulate Daniel C. Cassidy on celebrating fifty years of practicing law.  Dan, a founding partner of Liebert Cassidy Whitmore, is among the most experienced and accomplished practitioners in the fields of public sector labor relations, negotiations and employment law.

Nov 11, 2019 Private Education

AB 51 - Prohibits Employers From Requiring Arbitration Of FEHA Or Labor Code Claims As Condition Of Employment

AB 51 prohibits employers, starting January 1, 2020, from requiring any applicant or employee to submit any claims under the California Labor Code or the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) to mandatory arbitration, as a condition of employment, continued employment, or the receipt of any employment-related benefit. 

Nov 11, 2019 Private Education

AB 1223 – Requires Employers To Offer Employees Additional Unpaid Organ Donation Leave

Existing law, the Michelle Maykin Memorial Donation Protection Act, requires a private employer to permit an employee to take a leave of absence with pay, not exceeding 30 business days in a one-year period, for the purpose of organ donation.

Nov 11, 2019 Private Education

SB 188 – Expands Nondiscrimination Laws To Protect Traits Historically Associated With Race, Including Hair Texture And Hairstyles

SB 188 extends California’s workplace discrimination protections to cover race-related traits, including hair.  The bill expands the definition of “race” under the Fair Employment and Housing Act.  Effective January 1, 2020, “race” will include “traits historically associated with race, including, but not limited to, hair texture and protective hairstyles.”  The law further specifies that “protective hairstyles” “includes, but is not limited to, such hairstyles as braids, locks, and twists.”  This change in the law includes protection from such discrimination against employees.

Nov 11, 2019 Private Education

AB 9 – Increases FEHA Statute Of Limitations From One To Three Years

The California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA) prohibits discrimination, harassment, and retaliation in employment based on protected classifications such as race, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, religion, age over 40, disability, and medical condition, among other protected categories.  Currently, a covered individual (applicant, employee, or former employee) who alleges a violation under the FEHA has one year from the date of such unlawful practice to file a verified complaint with the Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) or the claim would generally be time-barred.

Nov 11, 2019 Private Education

SB 229 – Expands The Labor Commissioner’s Enforcement Of Retaliation Violations

SB 229 expands the Labor Commissioner’s mechanisms for enforcing an employer’s violation of the Labor Code’s anti-retaliation provisions.  If the Labor Commissioner investigates a retaliation complaint and determines that a violation took place under the Labor Code, the Labor Commissioner may issue a citation to the person or employer responsible for the violation.  SB 229 establishes procedural requirements and deadlines for the Labor Commissioner to file citations with the court for judicial enforcement and the collection of remedies.  The bill also provides procedural requirements for any person or employer who wishes to contest such citation.

Nov 11, 2019 Private Education

SB 778 – Extends Effective Date For Implementation Of Harassment Prevention Training Requirements To Calendar Year 2020

During the 2018 Legislative Session, the California Legislature passed SB 1343, which expanded harassment prevention training to include nonsupervisory employees and also require all employees to be trained in the calendar year 2019.  After the passage of SB 1343, there were a number of issues and concerns related to the implementation of the new law.  Governor Newsom has now signed into law clean-up legislation SB 778 to address these issues.  SB 778 will now delay the implementation of the new harassment training requirements and any refresher training until the calendar year 2020.  As urgency legislation, SB 778 went into effect immediately upon Governor Newsom’s approval of the law on August 30, 2019.