Daniel Cassidy Celebrates Fifty Years of Practicing Law

Daniel Cassidy Celebrates Fifty Years of Practicing Law

Liebert Cassidy Whitmore would like to congratulate Daniel C. Cassidy on celebrating fifty years of practicing law.  Dan, a founding partner of Liebert Cassidy Whitmore, is among the most experienced and accomplished practitioners in the fields of public sector labor relations, negotiations and employment law.

Dec 9, 2019 Fire Watch

Employee Who Was Terminated Because Of A Mistaken Belief He Was Unable To Work Need Not Prove Employer Had A Discriminatory Intent

John Glynn worked for Allegran as a pharmaceutical sales representative.  His job required him to drive to doctors’ offices to promote pharmaceuticals.  In January 2016, Glynn requested, and Allegran approved, a medical leave of absence for his serious eye condition. Glynn’s doctor indicated that Glynn was unable to work because he could not safely drive. While on medical leave, Glynn repeatedly requested reassignment to a vacant position that did not require driving, but he was never reassigned.

 

Dec 9, 2019 Fire Watch

Each Disability Retirement Check That Was Based On An Allegedly Discriminatory Policy Was A New Unlawful Employment Action

Joyce Carroll started working for the City and County of San Francisco (City) when she was 43 years old.  After 15 years of service, Carroll retired at age 58 due to rheumatoid arthritis.  On June 22, 2000, Carroll applied for disability retirement, and the City granted her request.  Accordingly, Carroll received monthly disability retirement benefit payments.

Dec 9, 2019 Briefing Room

Assembly Bill 1215 Prohibits Use Of Facial Recognition Systems On Body-Worn Cameras

On October 8, 2019, California Governor Gavin Newson signed Assembly Bill 1215 (AB 1215) into law. AB 1215 creates Penal Code Section 832.19 to prohibit law enforcement from installing, activating, or using a facial recognition system in connection with a law enforcement agency’s body-worn camera. Notably, this law shall remain in effect only until January 1, 2023, and will be repealed thereafter.

Dec 9, 2019 Briefing Room

LCW Defeats Former Police Officer’s Attempt To Revive FLSA Lawsuit

LCW Partner Geoffrey Sheldon, and Associate Attorneys Danny Yoo, and Emanuela Tala helped a city defeat a Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) lawsuit that a police officer brought.

Dec 9, 2019 Briefing Room

Assembly Bill 1600 Shortens Notice Requirements For Pitchess Motions In Criminal Cases And Allows Disclosure Of Some Supervisorial Officer Records

On October 8, 2019, Governor Newson signed Assembly Bill 1600 (AB 1600) into law. AB 1600 amends the law in two ways.  First, it amends Evidence Code Section 1043 to shorten the notice requirement from 16 to 10 days in a criminal case when a defendant files a motion to discover records of police officer misconduct—i.e., a Pitchess motion.  The notice requirement for Pitchess motions in civil cases remains 16 days.

Dec 9, 2019 Briefing Room

Whether Employee Could Have Been Reasonably Accommodated In A Different Work Location Was Irrelevant To Her Entitlement To CalPERS Disability Retirement

Cari McCormick worked as an appraiser for Lake County from a location within a courthouse. She developed symptoms she felt were caused by the courthouse environment, including pain, fatigue, and dizziness. McCormick asked the County for accommodations, such as permission to telecommute, but her supervisors declined to let her work anywhere other than in the courthouse. She filed a claim for workers’ compensation and took an extended leave of absence. As part of the workers’ compensation process, the courthouse was tested. The tests revealed no mold and showed acceptable air quality. Her workers’ compensation claim was denied and the County terminated her employment because she had exhausted her medical leave.