Alison R. Kalinski

Alison R. Kalinski Associate

Alison Kalinski is an associate in the Los Angeles office of Liebert Cassidy Whitmore where she provides advice and representation to clients in education, employment, and independent school law matters.   Alison is an experienced litigator and has represented clients in a wide array of matters and has argued before state and federal courts and the California Court of Appeal.  Alison has also represented employers in all aspects of employment disputes, including the hiring and termination of employees, discrimination and harassment issues, wage and hour laws, and other personnel issues.

Alison has significant experience drafting appellate briefs and has successfully argued appeals before the California Court of Appeal. She also regularly conducts depositions, drafts discovery, and negotiates and drafts settlement agreements.   She has represented large employers in litigation arising from gender discrimination and wage and hour matters, and obtained a full dismissal of all claims in both actions. Alison has also defended clients in the financial sector, sustaining a dismissal of plaintiff's claims through the appellate level.

Prior to joining Liebert Cassidy Whitmore, Alison practiced as a litigator in the New York City offices of two international law firms and then relocated to Los Angeles and practiced at a boutique litigation firm. 

Committed to pro bono work, Alison obtained cancellation of removal under the Violence Against Women Act for a victim of domestic violence and sex-trafficking and obtained asylum for a refugee from Cameroon who was tortured for being a homosexual.

While in law school, Alison served as managing editor of the Tulane Law Review.  Upon her graduation magna cum laude, Alison clerked for the Honorable Steven M. Gold in United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York.  Alison is admitted to practice in California and New York. 

Education

  • JD, Tulane Law School

  • BA, Washington University, St. Louis

ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS

Police Officer v. City (2016) - Following a two-day hearing, a Personnel Appeals Board upheld the termination of a Police Officer for dishonesty and failing to properly investigate and report domestic violence. The Police Officer responded to a call for a battery and arrived on the scene to find evidence of domestic violence. The Officer, however, failed to follow Department policies and procedures and adequately investigate the domestic violence. At the hearing, the Officer admitted his investigation was deficient and he could have done a better job. Even more troubling, however, is that when the Officer was investigated for failing to properly investigate the domestic violence, he provided misleading and dishonest statements. While the Officer stated he did not notice visible signs of domestic violence on the night of the incident, the body camera video plainly shows that he noticed an injury on the victim that night. The Board upheld his termination for dishonesty.

Education

  • JD, Tulane Law School

  • BA, Washington University, St. Louis

Mar 2, 2017

Writings Concerning Public Business Are Public Records – Even If They Are Sent, Received, Or Stored On An Employee’s Personal Email, Phone, Or Computer

The California Supreme Court today reversed the Court of Appeal in City of San Jose v. Superior Court (Smith), and held that communications by a city employee concerning public business on a personal account, such as email, phone or computer, may be subject to disclosure under the California Public Records Act (“PRA”).

Feb 7, 2017

No Bones About It: No Compensation for Canine Handlers Training to be Canine Instructors

The United States Court of Federal Claims (a court with nationwide jurisdiction hearing specialized claims against the federal government) recently held that a group of certified canine handlers were not entitled to compensation for time spent training to become certified canine instructors.  

Jul 13, 2016

The Fourth Circuit Holds that Fire Captains Are Non-Exempt Employees Under the FLSA Because Their Primary Job Duty Is Being a First Responder

The United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit (covering such east coast states as Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland) recently held that a group of fire Captains are entitled to overtime under the FLSA because their primary duty is being a first responder.  The case, Morrison v. County of Fairfax, Virginia, was decided June 21, 2016. 

Education

  • JD, Tulane Law School

  • BA, Washington University, St. Louis

9 May 2018
Consortium Trainings

Workplace Bullying: A Growing Concern

Gateway Public ERC Long Beach
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11 January 2018
Consortium Trainings

Workplace Bullying: A Growing Concern

South Bay ERC Gardena
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13 December 2017
13 December 2017
Consortium Trainings

Workplace Bullying: A Growing Concern

San Gabriel Valley ERC Alhambra
Read more

Education

  • JD, Tulane Law School

  • BA, Washington University, St. Louis

Contact Us

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Please contact Cynthia Weldon, Director of Marketing & Training, 310.981.2000.

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